hellog〜英語史ブログ     ChangeLog 最新     カテゴリ最新     前ページ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 次ページ / page 5 (11)

terminology - hellog〜英語史ブログ

最終更新時間: 2019-10-13 11:14

2016-06-11 Sat

#2602. Baugh and Cable の英語史からの設問 --- Chapters 9 to 11 [hel_education][terminology]

 「#2588. Baugh and Cable の英語史からの設問 --- Chapters 1 to 4」 ([2016-05-28-1]),「#2594. Baugh and Cable の英語史からの設問 --- Chapters 5 to 8」 ([2016-06-03-1]) に続き,最終編として9--11章の設問を提示する.

[ Chapter 9: The Appeal to Authority, 1650--1800 ]

1. Explain why the following people are important in historical discussions of the English language:
   John Dryden
   Jonathan Swift
   Samuel Johnson
   Joseph Priestley
   Robert Lowth
   Lindley Murray
   John Wilkins
   James Harris
   Thomas Sheridan
   George Campbell
2. How were the intellectual tendencies of the eighteenth century reflected in attitudes toward the English language?
3. What did eighteenth-century writers mean by ascertainment of the English language? What means did they have in mind?
4. What kinds of "corruptions" in the English language did Swift object to? Do you find them objectionable? Can you think of similar objections made by commentators today?
5. What had been accomplished in Italy and France during the seventeenth century to serve as an inspiration for those in England who were concerned with the English language?
6. Who were among the supporters of an English Academy? When did the movement reach its culmination?
7. Why did an English Academy fail to materialize? What served as substitutes for an academy in England?
8. What did Johnson hope for his Dictionary to accomplish?
9. What were the aims of the eighteenth-century prescriptive grammarians?
10. How would you characterize the difference in attitude between Robert Lowth's Short Introduction to English Grammar (1762) and Joseph Priestley's Rudiments of English Grammar (1761)? Which was more influential?
11. How did prescriptive grammarians such as Lowth arrive at their rules?
12. What were some of the weaknesses of the early grammarians?
13. Which foreign language contributed the most words to English during the eighteenth century?
14. In tracing the growth of progressive verb forms since the eighteenth century, what earlier patterns are especially important?
15. Give an example of the progressive passive. From what period can we date its development?

[ Chapter 10: The Nineteenth Century and After ]

1. Explain why the following people are important in historical discussions of the English Language:
   Sir James A. H. Murray
   Henry Bradley
   Sir William A. Craigie
   C. T. Onions
2. Define the following terms and for each provide examples of words or meanings that have entered the English language since 1800:
   Borrowing
   Self-explaining compound
   Compound formed from Greek or Latin elements
   Prefix
   Suffix
   Coinage
   Common word from proper name
   Old word with new meaning
   Extension of meaning
   Narrowing of meaning
   Degeneration of meaning
   Regeneration of meaning
   Slang
   Verb-adverb combination
3. What distinction has been drawn between cultural levels and functional varieties of English? Do you find the distinction valid?
4. What are the principal regional dialects of English in the British Isles? What are some of the characteristics of these dialects?
5. What are the main national and areal varieties of English that have developed in countries that were once part of the British Empire?
6. Summarize the main efforts at spelling reform in England and the United States during the past century. Do you think that movement for spelling reform will succeed in the future?
7. How long did it take to produce the Oxford English Dictionary? By what name was it originally known?
8. What changes have occurred in English grammatical forms and conventions during the past two centuries?

[ Chapter 11: The English Language in America ]

1. Explain why the following people are important in historical discussions of the English language:
   Noah Webster
   Benjamin Franklin
   James Russell Lowell
   H. L. Mencken
   Hans Kurath
   Leonard Bloomfield
   Noam Chomsky
   William Labov
2. Define, identify, or explain briefly:
   Old Northwest Territory
   An American Dictionary of the English Language (1828)
   The American Spelling Book
   "Flat a"
   African American Vernacular English
   Pidgin
   Creole
   Gullah
   Americanism
   Linguistic Atlas of the United States and Canada
   Phoneme
   Allophone
   Generative grammar
3. What three great periods of European immigration can be distinguished in the peopling of the United States?
4. What groups settled the Middle Atlantic States? How do the origins of these settlers contrast with the origins of the settlers in New England and the South Atlantic states?
5. What accounts for the high degree of uniformity of American English?
6. Is American English more or less conservative than British English? In trying to answer the question, what geographical divisions must one recognize in both the United States and Britain? Does the answer that applies to pronunciation apply also to vocabulary?
7. What considerations moved Noah Webster to advocate distinctly American form of English?
8. In what features of American pronunciation is it possible to find Webster's influence?
9. What are the most noticeable differences in pronunciation between British and American English?
10. What three main dialects in American English have been distinguished by dialectologists associated with the Linguistic Atlas of the United States and Canada? What three dialects had traditionally been distinguished?
11. According to Baugh and Cable, what eight American dialects are prominent enough to warrant individual characterization?
12. What is the Creole hypothesis regarding African American Vernacular English?
13. To what may one attribute certain similarities between the speech of New England and that of the South?
14. To what may one attribute the preservation of r in American English?
15. To what extent are attitudes which were expressed in the nineteenth-century "controversy over Americanisms" still alive today? How pervasive now is the "purist attitude"?
16. What are the main historical dictionaries of American English?


 ・ Cable, Thomas. A Companion to History of the English Language. 3rd ed. London: Routledge, 2002.

[ | 固定リンク | 印刷用ページ ]

2016-06-03 Fri

#2594. Baugh and Cable の英語史からの設問 --- Chapters 5 to 8 [hel_education][terminology]

 「#2588. Baugh and Cable の英語史からの設問 --- Chapters 1 to 4」 ([2016-05-28-1]) に続いて,5--8章の設問を提示する.Baugh and Cable の復習のお供にどうぞ.

[ Chapter 5: The Norman Conquest and the Subjection of English, 1066--1200 ]

1. Explain why the following people are important in historical discussions of the English language:
   Æthelred
   Edward the Confessor
   Godwin
   Harold
   William, duke of Normandy
   Henry I
   Henry II
2. How would the English language probably have been different if the Norman Conquest had never occurred?
3. From what settlers does Normandy derive its name? When did they come to France?
4. Why did William consider that he had claim on the English throne?
5. What was the decisive battle between the Normans and the English? How did the Normans win it?
6. When was William crowned king of England? How long did it take him to complete his conquest of England and gain complete recognition? In what parts of the country did he face rebellions?
7. What happened to Englishmen in positions of church and state under William's rule?
8. For how long after the Norman Conquest did French remain the principal language of the upper classes in England?
9. How did William divide his lands at his death?
10. What was the extent of the lands ruled by Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine?
11. What was generally the attitude of the French kings and upper classes to the English language?
12. What does the literature written under the patronage of the English court indicate about French culture and language in England during this period?
13. How complete was the fusion or the French and English peoples in England?
14. In general, which parts of the population spoke English, and which French?
15. To what extent did the upper classes learn English? What can one infer concerning Henry II's knowledge of English?
16. How far down in the social scale was knowledge of French at all general?

[ Chapter 6: The Reestablishment of English, 1200--1500 ]

1. Explain why the following are important in historical discussions of the English language:
   King John
   Philip, king of France
   Henry III
   The Hundred Years' War
   The Black Death
   The Peasants' Revolt
   Statute of Pleading
   Layamon
   Geoffrey Chaucer
   John Wycliffe
2. In what year did England lose Normandy? What events brought about the loss?
3. What effect did the loss of Normandy have upon the nobility of France and England and consequently upon the English language?
4. Despite the loss of Normandy, what circumstances encouraged the French to continue coming to England during the long reign of Henry III (1216--1272)?
5. The arrival of foreigners during Henry III's reign undoubtedly delayed the spread of English among the upper classes. In what ways did these events actually benefit the English language?
6. What was the status of French throughout Europe in the thirteenth century?
7. What explains the fact that the borrowing of French words begins to assume large proportions during the second half of the thirteenth century, as the importance of the French language in England is declining?
8. What general conclusions can one draw about the position of English at the end of the thirteenth century?
9. What can one conclude about the use of French in the church and the universities by the fourteenth century?
10. What kind of French was spoken in England, and how was it regarded?
11. In what way did the Hundred Years' War probably contribute to the decline of French in England?
12. According to Baugh and Cable, the Black Death reduced the numbers of the lower classes disproportionately and yet indirectly increased the importance of the language that they spoke. Why was this so?
13. What specifically can one say about changing conditions for the middle class in England during the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries? What effect did these changes have upon the English language?
14. In what year was Parliament first opened with a speech in English?
15. What statute marks the official recognition of the English language in England?
16. When did English begin to be used in the schools?
17. What was the status of the French language in England by the end of the fifteenth century?
18. About when did English become generally adopted for the records of towns and the central government?
19. What does English literature between 1150 and 1350 tell us about the changing fortunes of the English language?
20. What do the literary accomplishments of the period between 1350 and 1400 imply about the status of English?

[ Chapter 7: Middle English ]

1. Define:
   Leveling
   Analogy
   Anglo-Norman
   Central French
   Hybrid forms
   Latin influence of the Third Period
   Aureate diction
   Standard English
2. What phonetic changes brought about the leveling of inflectional endings in Middle English?
3. What accounts for the -e in Modern English stone, the Old English form of which was stān in the nominative and accusative singular?
4. Generally what happened to inflectional endings of nouns in Middle English?
5. What two methods of indicating the plural of nouns remained common in early Middle English?
6. Which form of the adjective became the form for all cases by the close of the Middle English period?
7. What happened to the demonstratives , sēo, þæt and þēs, þēos, þis in Middle English?
8. Why were the losses not so great in the personal pronouns? What distinction did the personal pronouns lose?
9. What is the origin of the th- forms of the personal pronoun in the third person plural?
10. What were the principal changes in the verb during the Middle English period?
11. Name five strong verbs that were becoming weak during the thirteenth century.
12. Name five strong post participles that have remained in use after the verb became weak.
13. How many of the Old English strong verbs remain in the language today?
14. What effect did the decay of inflections have upon grammatical gender in Middle English?
15. To what extent did the Norman Conquest affect the grammar of English?
16. In the borrowing of French words into English, how is the period before 1250 distinguished from the period after?
17. Into what general classes do borrowings of French vocabulary fall?
18. What accounts for the difference in pronunciation between words introduced into English after the Norman Conquest and the corresponding words in Modem French?
19. Why are the French words borrowed during the fifteenth century of a bookish quality?
20. What is the period of the greatest borrowing of French words? Altogether about how many French words were adopted during the Middle English period?
21. What principle is illustrated by the pairs ox/beef, sheep/mutton, swine/pork, and calf/veal?
22. What generally happened to the Old English prefixes and suffixes in Middle English?
23. Despite the changes in the English language brought about by the Norman Conquest, in what ways was the language still English?
24. What was the main source of Latin borrowings during the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries?
25. In which Middle English writers is aureate diction most evident?
26. What tendency may be observed in the following sets of synonyms: rise--mount--ascend, ask--question--interrogate, goodness--virtue--probity?
27. What kind of contact did the English have with speakers of Flemish, Dutch, and Low German during the late Middle Ages?
28. What are the five principal dialects of Middle English?
29. Which dialect of Middle English became the basis for Standard English? What causes contributed to the establishment of this dialect?
30. Why did the speech of London have special importance during the late Middle Ages?

[ Chapter 8: The Renaissance, 1500--1650 ]

1. Explain why the following people are important in historical discussions of the English language:
   Richard Mulcaster
   John Hart
   William Bullokar
   Sir John Cheke
   Thomas Wilson
   Sir Thomas Elyot
   Sir Thomas More
   Edmund Spenser
   Robert Cawdrey
   Nathaniel Bailey
2. Define:
   Inkhorn terms
   Oversea language
   Chaucerisms
   Latin influence of the Fourth Period
   Great Vowel Shift
   His-genitive
   Group possessive
   Orthography
3. What new forces began to affect the English language in the Modern English period? Why may it be said that these forces were both radical and conservative?
4. What problems did the modern European languages face in the sixteenth century?
5. Why did English have to be defended as language of scholarship? How did the scholarly recognition of English come about?
6. Who were among the defenders of borrowing foreign words?
7. What was the general attitude toward inkhorn terms by the end of Elizabeth's reign?
8. What were some of the ways in which Latin words changed their form as they entered the English language?
9. Why were some words in Renaissance English rejected while others survived?
10. What classes of strange words did sixteenth-century purists object to?
11. When was the first English dictionary published? What was the main purpose of English dictionaries throughout the seventeenth century?
12. From the discussions in Baugh and Cable §177 and below, summarize the principal features in which Shakespeare's pronunciation differs from your own.
13. Why is vowel length important in discussing sound changes in the history of the English language?
14. Why is the Great Vowel Shift responsible for the anomalous use of the vowel symbols in English spelling?
15. How does the spelling of unstressed syllables in English fail to represent accurately the pronunciation?
16. What nouns with the old weak plural in -n can be found in Shakespeare?
17. Why do Modern English nouns have an apostrophe in the possessive?
18. When did the group possessive become common in England?
19. How did Shakespeare's usage in adjectives differ from current usage?
20. What distinctions, at different periods, were made by the forms thou, thy, thee? When did the forms fall out of general use?
21. How consistently were the nominative ye and the objective you distinguished during the Renaissance?
22. What is the origin of the form its?
23. When did who begin to be used as relative pronoun? What are the sources of the form?
24. What forms for the the third person singular of the verb does one find in Shakespeare? What happened to these forms during the seventeenth century?
25. How would cultivated speakers of Elizabethan times have regarded Shakespeare's use of the double negative in "Thou hast spoken no word all this time---nor understood none neither"?


 ・ Cable, Thomas. A Companion to History of the English Language. 3rd ed. London: Routledge, 2002.

Referrer (Inside): [2016-06-11-1]

[ | 固定リンク | 印刷用ページ ]

2016-05-28 Sat

#2588. Baugh and Cable の英語史からの設問 --- Chapters 1 to 4 [hel_education][terminology]

 今期,大学の演習で,英語史の古典的名著 Baugh and Cable の A History of the English Language の第6版を読んでいる.この英語史概説書について,本ブログでは「#2089. Baugh and Cable の英語史概説書の目次」 ([2015-01-15-1]),「#2182. Baugh and Cable の英語史第6版」 ([2015-04-18-1]),「#2488. 専門科目かつ教養科目としての英語史」 ([2016-02-18-1]) でレビューしてきたし,その他の多くの記事でも参照・引用してきた.
 この英語史書には,演習問題集がコンパニオンとして出版されている.5版に対するコンパニオンなので,細かく見ると6版と対応しない部分もあるが,各章の内容が理解できているかどうかの確認としては十分に利用できる.今回は,1章から4章の設問を集めてみた.一覧すると,一種の英語史用語集としても使える.

[ Chapter 1: English Present and Future ]

1. Define the following terms, which appear in Chapter 1 of Baugh and Cable, History of the English Language (5th ed.):
   Analogy
   Borrowing
   Inflection
   Natural gender
   Grammatical gender
   Idiom
   Lingua franca
2. Upon what does the importance of language depend?
3. About how many people speak English as native language?
4. Which language of the world has the largest number of speakers?
5. What are the six largest European languages after English?
6. Why is English so widely used as second language?
7. Which languages are likely to grow most rapidly in the foreseeable future? Why?
8. What are the official languages of the United Nations?
9. For speaker of another language learning English, what are three assets of the language?
10. What difficulties does the non-native speaker of English encounter?

[ Chapter 2: The Indo-European Family of Languages ]

1. Explain why the following people are important in studies of the Indo-European family of languages:
   Panini
   Ulfilas
   Jacob Grimm
   Karl Verner
   Ferdinand de Saussure
2. Define, identify, or explain briefly:
   Family of languages
   Indo-European
   Rig-veda
   Koiné
   Langue d'oïl, langue d'oc
   Vulgar Latin
   Proto-Germanic
   Second Sound Shift
   West Germanic
   Hittites
   Laryngeals
   Object-Verb structure
   Centum and satem languages
   Kurgans
3. What is Sanskrit? Why is it important in the reconstruction of Indo-European?
4. When did the sound change described by Grimm's Law occur? In what year did Grimm formulate the law?
5. Name the eleven principal groups in the Indo-European family.
6. Approximately what date can be assigned to the oldest texts of Vedic Sanskrit?
7. From what non-Indo-European language has modern Persian borrowed much vocabulary?
8. Which of the dialects of ancient Greece was the most important? In what centuries did its literature flourish?
9. Why are the Romance languages so called? Name the modern Romance languages.
10. What were the important dialects of French in the Middle Ages? Which became the basis for standard French?
11. For the student of Indo-European, what is especially interesting about Lithuanian?
12. Name the Slavic languages. With what other group does Slavic form branch of the Indo-European tree?
13. Into what three groups is the Germanic branch divided? For which of the Germanic languages do we have the earliest texts?
14. From what period do our texts of Scandinavian languages date?
15. Why is Old English classified as Low German language?
16. Name the two branches of the Celtic family and the modern representative of each.
17. Where are the Celtic languages now spoken? What is happening to these languages?
18. What two languages of importance to Indo-European studies were discovered in this century?
19. Why have the words for beech and bee in the various Indo-European languages been important in establishing the location of the Indo-European homeland?
20. What light have recent archaeological discoveries thrown on the Indo-European homeland?

[ Chapter 3: Old English ]

1. Explain why the following are important in historical discussions of the English language:
   Claudius
   Vortigern
   The Anglo-Saxon Heptarchy
   Beowulf
   Alfred the Great
   Ecclesiastical History of the English People
2. Define the following terms:
   Synthetic language
   Analytic language
   Vowel declension
   Consonant declension
   Grammatical gender
   Dual number
   Paleolithic Age
   Neolithic Age
3. Who were the first people in England about whose language we have definite knowledge?
4. When did the Romans conquer England, and when did they withdraw?
5. At approximately what date did the invasion of England by the Germanic tribes begin?
6. Where were the homes of the Angles, Saxons, and Jutes?
7. Where does the name English come from?
8. What characteristics does English share with other Germanic languages?
9. To which branch of Germanic docs English belong?
10. What are the dates of Old English, Middle English, and Modern English?
11. What are the four dialects of Old English?
12. About what percentage of the Old English vocabulary is no longer in use?
13. Explain the difference between strong and weak declensions of adjectives.
14. How does the Old English definite article differ from the definite article of Modern English?
15. Explain the difference between weak and strong verbs.
16. How many classes of strong verbs were there in Old English?
17. In what ways was the Old English vocabulary expanded?

[ Chapter 4: Foreign Influences on Old English ]

1. Explain why the following people and events are important in historical discussions of the English language:
   St Augustine
   Bede
   Alcuin
   Dunstan
   Ælfric
   Cnut
   Treaty of Wedmore
   Battle of Maldon
2. Define the following terms:
   i-Umlaut
   Palatal diphthongization
   The Danelaw
3. How extensive was the Celtic influence on Old English?
4. What accounts for the difference between the influence of Celtic and that of Latin upon the English language?
5. During what three periods did Old English borrow from Latin?
6. What event, according to Bede, inspired the mission of St Augustine? In what year did die mission begin?
7. What were the three periods of Viking attacks on England?
8. What are some of the characteristic endings of place-names borrowed from Danish?
9. About how many Scandinavian place-names have been counted in England?
10. Approximately how many Scandinavian words appeared in Old English?
11. From what language has English acquired the pronouns they, their, them, and the present plural are of the verb to be? What were the equivalent Old English words?
12. What inflectional elements have been attributed to Scandinavian influence?
13. What influence did Christianity have on Old English?


 ・ Baugh, Albert C. and Thomas Cable. A History of the English Language. 6th ed. London: Routledge, 2013.
 ・ Cable, Thomas. A Companion to History of the English Language. 3rd ed. London: Routledge, 2002.

Referrer (Inside): [2016-06-11-1] [2016-06-03-1]

[ | 固定リンク | 印刷用ページ ]

2016-05-09 Mon

#2569. dead metaphor (2) [metaphor][conceptual_metaphor][rhetoric][cognitive_linguistics][terminology]

 昨日の記事 ([2016-05-08-1]) に引き続き,dead metaphor について.dead metaphor とは,かつては metaphor だったものが,やがて使い古されて比喩力・暗示力を失ってしまった表現を指すものであると説明した.しかし,メタファーと認知の密接な関係を論じた Lakoff and Johnson (55) は,dead metaphor をもう少し広い枠組みのなかでとらえている.the foot of the mountain の例を引きながら,なぜこの表現が "dead" metaphor なのかを丁寧に説明している.

Examples like the foot of the mountain are idiosyncratic, unsystematic, and isolated. They do not interact with other metaphors, play no particularly interesting role in our conceptual system, and hence are not metaphors that we live by. . . . If any metaphorical expressions deserve to be called "dead," it is these, though they do have a bare spark of life, in that they are understood partly in terms of marginal metaphorical concepts like A MOUNTAIN IS A PERSON.
   It is important to distinguish these isolated and unsystematic cases from the systematic metaphorical expressions we have been discussing. Expressions like wasting time, attacking positions, going our separate ways, etc., are reflections of systematic metaphorical concepts that structure our actions and thoughts. They are "alive" in the most fundamental sense: they are metaphors we live by. The fact that they are conventionally fixed within the lexicon of English makes them no less alive.


 「死んでいる」のは,the foot of the mountain という句のメタファーや,そのなかの foot という語義におけるメタファーにとどまらない.むしろ,表現の背後にある "A MOUNTAIN IS A PERSON" という概念メタファー (conceptual metaphor) そのものが「死んでいる」のであり,だからこそ,これを拡張して *the shoulder of the mountain や *the head of the mountain などとは一般的に言えないのだ.Metaphors We Live By という題の本を著わし,比喩が生きているか死んでいるか,話者の認識において活性化されているか否かを追究した Lakoff and Johnson にとって,the foot of the mountain が「死んでいる」というのは,共時的にこの表現のなかに比喩性が感じられないという局所的な事実を指しているのではなく,話者の認知や行動の基盤として "A MOUNTAIN IS A PERSON" という概念メタファーがほとんど機能していないことを指しているのである.引用の最後で述べられている通り,表現が慣習的に固定化しているかどうか,つまり常套句であるかどうかは,必ずしもそれが「死んでいる」ことを意味しないという点を理解しておくことは重要である.

 ・ Lakoff, George, and Mark Johnson. Metaphors We Live By. Chicago and London: U of Chicago P, 1980.

[ | 固定リンク | 印刷用ページ ]

2016-05-08 Sun

#2568. dead metaphor (1) [metaphor][rhetoric][cognitive_linguistics][terminology][semantics][semantic_change][etymology]

 metaphor として始まったが,後に使い古されて常套語句となり,もはや metaphor として感じられなくなったような表現は,"dead metaphor" (死んだメタファー)と呼ばれる.「机の脚」や「台風の目」というときの「脚」や「目」は,本来の人間(あるいは動物)の体の部位を指すものからの転用であるという感覚は希薄である.共時的には,本来的な語義からほぼ独立した別の語義として理解されていると思われる.英語の the legs of a tablethe foot of the mountain も同様だ.かつては生き生きとした metaphor として機能していたものが,時とともに衰退 (fading) あるいは脱メタファー化 (demetaphorization) を経て,化石化したものといえる(前田,p. 127).
 しかし,上のメタファーの例は完全に「死んでいる」わけではない.後付けかもしれないが,机の脚と人間の脚とはイメージとして容易につなげることはできるからだ.もっと「死んでいる」例として,pupil の派生語義がある.この語の元来の語義は「生徒,学童」だが,相手の瞳に映る自分の像が小さい子供のように見えるところから転じて「瞳」の語義を得た.しかし,この意味的なつながりは現在では語源学者でない限り,意識にはのぼらず,共時的には別の単語として理解されている.件の比喩は,すでにほぼ「死んでいる」といってよい.
 「死んでいる」程度の差はあれ,この種の dead metaphor は言語に満ちている.「#2187. あらゆる語の意味がメタファーである」 ([2015-04-23-1]) で列挙したように,語という単位で考えても,その語源をひもとけば,非常に多数の語の意味が dead metaphor として存在していることがわかる.advert, comprehend など,そこであげた多くのラテン語由来の語は,英語への借用がなされた時点で,すでに共時的に dead metaphor であり,「死んだメタファーの輸入品」(前田,p. 127)と呼ぶべきものである.

 ・ 前田 満 「意味変化」『意味論』(中野弘三(編)) 朝倉書店,2012年,106--33頁.
 ・ 谷口 一美 『学びのエクササイズ 認知言語学』 ひつじ書房,2006年.

Referrer (Inside): [2016-05-09-1]

[ | 固定リンク | 印刷用ページ ]

2016-05-04 Wed

#2564. varietylect [variety][terminology][style][register][dialect][sociolinguistics][lexical_diffusion][speed_of_change][schedule_of_language_change]

 社会言語学では variety (変種)という用語をよく用いるが,ときに似たような使い方で lect という用語も聞かれる.これは dialect や sociolectlect を取り出したものだが,用語上の使い分けがあるのか疑問に思い,Trudgill の用語集を繰ってみた.それぞれの項目を引用する.

variety A neutral term used to refer to any kind of language --- a dialect, accent, sociolect, style or register --- that a linguist happens to want to discuss as a separate entity for some particular purpose. Such a variety can be very general, such as 'American English', or very specific, such as 'the lower working-class dialect of the Lower East Side of New York City'. See also lect

lect Another term for variety or 'kind of language' which is neutral with respect to whether the variety is a sociolect or a (geographical) dialect. The term was coined by the American linguist Charles-James Bailey who, as part of his work in variation theory, has been particularly interested in the arrangement of lects in implicational tables, and the diffusion of linguistic changes from one linguistic environment to another and one lect to another. He has also been particularly concerned to define lects in terms of their linguistic characteristics rather than their geographical or social origins.


 案の定,両語とも "a kind of language" ほどでほぼ同義のようだが,variety のほうが一般的に用いられるとはいってよいだろう.ただし,lect は言語変化においてある言語項が lect A から lect B へと分布を広げていく過程などを論じる際に使われることが多いようだ.つまり,lect は語彙拡散 (lexical_diffusion) の理論と相性がよいということになる.
 なお,上の lect の項で参照されている Charles-James Bailey は,「#1906. 言語変化のスケジュールは言語学的環境ごとに異なるか」 ([2014-07-16-1]) で引用したように,確かに語彙拡散や言語変化のスケジュール (schedule_of_language_change) の問題について理論的に扱っている社会言語学者である.

 ・ Trudgill, Peter. A Glossary of Sociolinguistics. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003.

[ | 固定リンク | 印刷用ページ ]

2016-05-03 Tue

#2563. 通時言語学,共時言語学という用語を巡って [saussure][terminology][diachrony][methodology][history_of_linguistics][evolution]

 「#2555. ソシュールによる言語の共時態と通時態」 ([2016-04-25-1]) で,共時態と通時態の区別について話題にした.ところで,Saussure (116--17) は Cours で,通時態と共時態の峻別を説いた段落の直後に,標題の2つの言語学の呼称について次のように論じている.

Voilà pourquoi nous distinguons deux linguistiques. Comment les désignerons-nous? Les termes qui s'offrent ne sont pas tous également propres à marquer cette distinction. Ainsi histoire et «linguistique historique» ne sont pas utilisables, car ils appellent des idées trop vagues; comme l'histoire politique comprend la description des époques aussi bien que la narration des événements, on pourrait s'imaginer qu'en décrivant des états de la langue succesifs on étudie la langue selon l'axe du temps; pour cela, il faudrait envisager séparément les phénomènes qui font passer la langue d'un état à un autre. Les termes d'évolution et de linguistique évolutive sont plus précis, et nous les emploierons souvent; par opposition on peut parler de la science des états de langue ou linguistique statique.
   Mais pour mieux marquer cette opposition et ce croisement de deux ordres de phénomènes relatifs au même objet, nous préfèrons parler de linguistique synchronique et de linguistique diachronique. Est synchronique tout ce qui se rapporte à l'aspect statique de notre science, diachronique tout ce qui a trait aux évolutions. De même synchronie et diachronie désigneront respectivement un état de langue et une phase d'évolution.


 ここで Saussure は用語へのこだわりを見せている.Saussure が「歴史」言語学 (linguistique historique) では曖昧だというのは,時間軸上の異なる点における状態を次々と記述することも「歴史」であれば,ある共時的体系から別の共時的体系へと時間軸に沿って進ませている現象について語ることも「歴史」であるからだ.後者の意味を表わすためには「歴史」だけでは不正確であるということだろう.そこで後者に特化した用語として "linguistic historique" の代わりに "linguistique évolutive" (対して "linguistic statique")を用いることを選んだ.さらに,2つの軸の対立を用語上で目立たせるために,"linguistique diachronique" (対して "linguistic synchronique") を採用したのである.
 このような経緯で通時態と共時態の用語上の対立が確立してきたわけが,進化言語学 ("linguistique évolutive") と静態言語学 ("linguistic statique") という呼称も,個人的にはすこぶる直感的で捨てがたい気がする.

 ・ Saussure, Ferdinand de. Cours de linguistique générale. Ed. Tullio de Mauro. Paris: Payot & Rivages, 2005.

Referrer (Inside): [2018-06-05-1] [2016-08-10-1]

[ | 固定リンク | 印刷用ページ ]

2016-04-30 Sat

#2560. 古英語の形容詞強変化屈折は名詞と代名詞の混合パラダイム [adjective][ilame][terminology][morphology][inflection][oe][germanic][paradigm][personal_pronoun][noun]

 古英語の形容詞の強変化・弱変化の区別については,ゲルマン語派の顕著な特徴として「#182. ゲルマン語派の特徴」 ([2009-10-26-1]),「#785. ゲルマン度を測るための10項目」 ([2011-06-21-1]),「#687. ゲルマン語派の形容詞の強変化と弱変化」 ([2011-03-15-1]) で取り上げ,中英語における屈折の衰退については ilame の各記事で話題にした.
 強変化と弱変化の区別は古英語では名詞にもみられた.弱変化形容詞の強・弱屈折は名詞のそれと形態的におよそ平行しているといってよいが,若干の差異がある.ことに形容詞の強変化屈折では,対応する名詞の強変化屈折と異なる語尾が何カ所かに見られる.歴史的には,その違いのある箇所には名詞ではなく人称代名詞 (personal_pronoun) の屈折語尾が入り込んでいる.つまり,古英語の形容詞強変化屈折は,名詞屈折と代名詞屈折が混合したようなものとなっている.この経緯について,Hogg and Fulk (146) の説明に耳を傾けよう.

As in other Gmc languages, adjectives in OE have a double declension which is syntactically determined. When an adjective occurs attributively within a noun phrase which is made definite by the presence of a demonstrative, possessive pronoun or possessive noun, then it follows one set of declensional patterns, but when an adjective is in any other noun phrase or occurs predicatively, it follows a different set of patterns . . . . The set of patterns assumed by an adjective in a definite context broadly follows the set of inflexions for the n-stem nouns, whilst the set of patterns taken in other indefinite contexts broadly follows the set of inflexions for a- and ō-stem nouns. For this reason, when adjectives take the first set of inflexions they are traditionally called weak adjectives, and when they take the second set of inflexions they are traditionally called strong adjectives. Such practice, although practically universal, has less to recommend it than may seem to be the case, both historically and synchronically. Historically, . . . some adjectival inflexions derive from pronominal rather than nominal forms; synchronically, the adjectives underwent restructuring at an even swifter pace than the nouns, so that the terminology 'strong' or 'vocalic' versus 'weak' or 'consonantal' becomes misleading. For this reason the two declensions of the adjective are here called 'indefinite' and 'definite' . . . .


 具体的に強変化屈折のどこが起源的に名詞的ではなく代名詞的かというと,acc.sg.masc (-ne), dat.sg.masc.neut. (-um), gen.dat.sg.fem (-re), nom.acc.pl.masc. (-e), gen.pl. for all genders (-ra) である (Hogg and Fulk 150) .
 強変化・弱変化という形態に基づく,ゲルマン語比較言語学の伝統的な区分と用語は,古英語の形容詞については何とか有効だが,中英語以降にはほとんど無意味となっていくのであり,通時的にはより一貫した統語・意味・語用的な機能に着目した不定 (definiteness) と定 (definiteness) という区別のほうが妥当かもしれない.

 ・ Hogg, Richard M. and R. D. Fulk. A Grammar of Old English. Vol. 2. Morphology. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2011.

[ | 固定リンク | 印刷用ページ ]

2016-04-25 Mon

#2555. ソシュールによる言語の共時態と通時態 [saussure][diachrony][methodology][terminology][linguistics]

 ソシュール以来,言語を考察する視点として異なる2つの角度が区別されてきた.共時態 (synchrony) と通時態 (diachrony) である.本ブログではこの2分法を前提とした上で,それに依拠したり,あるいは懐疑的に議論したりしてきた.この有名な2分法について,言語学用語辞典などを参照して,あらためて確認しておこう.
 まず,丸山のソシュール用語解説 (309--10) には次のようにある.

synchronie/diachronie [共時態/通時態]
 ある科学の対象が価値体系 (système de valeurs) として捉えられるとき,時間の軸上の一定の面における状態 (état) を共時態と呼び,その静態的事実を,時間 (temps) の作用を一応無視して記述する研究を共時言語学 (linguistique synchronique) という。これはあくまでも方法論上の視点であって,現実には,体系は刻々と移り変わるばかりか,複数の体系が重なり合って共存していることを忘れてはならない。〔中略〕これに対して,時代の移り変わるさまざまな段階で記述された共時的断面と断面を比較し,体系総体の変化を辿ろうとする研究が,通時言語学 (linguistique diachronique) であり,そこで対象とされる価値の変動 (déplacement) が通時態である。


 同じく丸山 (73--74) では,ソシュールの考えを次のように解説している.

「言語学には二つの異なった科学がある。静態または共時言語学と,動態または通時言語学がそれである」。この二つの区別は,およそ価値体系を対象とする学問であれば必ずなされるべきであって,たとえば経済学と経済史が同一科学のなかでもはっきりと分かれた二分野を構成するのと同時に,言語学においても二つの領域を峻別すべきであるというのが彼〔ソシュール〕の考えであった。ソシュールはある一定時期の言語の記述を共時言語学 (linguistique synchronique),時代とともに変化する言語の記述を通時言語学 (linguistique diachronique) と呼んでいる。


 Crystal の用語辞典では,pp. 469, 142 にそれぞれ見出しが立てられている.

synchronic (adj.) One of the two main temporal dimensions of LINGUISTIC investigation introduced by Ferdinand de Saussure, the other being DIACHRONIC. In synchronic linguistics, languages are studied at a theoretical point in time: one describes a 'state' of the language, disregarding whatever changes might be taking place. For example, one could carry out a synchronic description of the language of Chaucer, or of the sixteenth century, or of modern-day English. Most synchronic descriptions are of contemporary language states, but their importance as a preliminary to diachronic study has been stressed since Saussure. Linguistic investigations, unless specified to the contrary, are assumed to be synchronic; they display synchronicity.


diachronic (adj.) One of the two main temporal dimensions of LINGUISTIC investigation introduced by Ferdinand de Saussure, the other being SYNCHRONIC. In diachronic linguistics (sometimes called linguistic diachrony), LANGUAGES are studied from the point of view of their historical development --- for example, the changes which have taken place between Old and Modern English could be described in phonological, grammatical and semantic terms ('diachronic PHONOLOGY/SYNTAX/SEMANTICS'). An alternative term is HISTORICAL LINGUISTICS. The earlier study of language in historical terms, known as COMPARATIVE PHILOLOGY, does not differ from diachronic linguistics in subject-matter, but in aims and method. More attention is paid in the latter to the use of synchronic description as a preliminary to historical study, and to the implications of historical work for linguistic theory in general.


 ・ 丸山 圭三郎 『ソシュール小事典』 大修館,1985年.
 ・ Crystal, David, ed. A Dictionary of Linguistics and Phonetics. 6th ed. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2008. 295--96.

[ | 固定リンク | 印刷用ページ ]

2016-04-24 Sun

#2554. 固有屈折と文脈屈折 [terminology][inflection][morphology][syntax][derivation][compound][word_formation][category][ilame]

 屈折 (inflection) には,より語彙的な含蓄をもつ固有屈折 (inherent inflection) と,より統語的な含蓄をもつ文脈屈折 (contextual inflection) の2種類があるという議論がある.Booij (1) によると,

Inherent inflection is the kind of inflection that is not required by the syntactic context, although it may have syntactic relevance. Examples are the category number for nouns, comparative and superlative degree of the adjective, and tense and aspect for verbs. Other examples of inherent verbal inflection are infinitives and participles. Contextual inflection, on the other hand, is that kind of inflection that is dictated by syntax, such as person and number markers on verbs that agree with subjects and/or objects, agreement markers for adjectives, and structural case markers on nouns.


 このような屈折の2タイプの区別は,これまでの研究でも指摘されることはあった.ラテン語の単数形 urbs と複数形 urbes の違いは,統語上の数の一致にも関与することはするが,主として意味上の数において異なる違いであり,固有屈折が関係している.一方,主格形 urbs と対格形 urbem の違いは,意味的な違いも関与しているが,主として統語的に要求される差異であるという点で,統語の関与が一層強いと判断される.したがって,ここでは文脈屈折が関係しているといえるだろう.
 英語について考えても,名詞の数などに関わる固有屈折は,意味的・語彙的な側面をもっている.対応する複数形のない名詞,対応する単数形のない名詞(pluralia tantum),単数形と複数形で中核的な意味が異なる(すなわち異なる2語である)例をみれば,このことは首肯できるだろう.動詞の不定形と分詞の間にも類似の関係がみられる.これらは,基体と派生語・複合語の関係に近いだろう.
 一方,文脈屈折がより深く統語に関わっていることは,その標識が固有屈折の標識よりも外側に付加されることと関与しているようだ.Booij (12) 曰く,"[C]ontextual inflection tends to be peripheral with respect to inherent inflection. For instance, case is usually external to number, and person and number affixes on verbs are external to tense and aspect morphemes".
 言語習得の観点からも,固有屈折と文脈屈折の区別,特に前者が後者を優越するという説は支持されるようだ.固有屈折は独自の意味をもつために直接に文の生成に貢献するが,文脈屈折は独立した情報をもたず,あくまで統語的に間接的な意義をもつにすぎないからだろう.
 では,言語変化の事例において,上で提起されたような固有屈折と文脈屈折の区別,さらにいえば前者の後者に対する優越は,どのように表現され得るのだろうか.英語史でもみられるように,種々の文法的機能をもった名詞,形容詞,動詞などの屈折語尾が消失していったときに,いずれの機能から,いずれの屈折語尾の部分から順に消失していったか,その順序が明らかになれば,それと上記2つの屈折タイプとの連動性や相関関係を調べることができるだろう.もしかすると,中英語期に生じた形容詞屈折の事例が,この理論的な問題に,何らかの洞察をもたらしてくれるのではないかと感じている.中英語期の形容詞屈折の問題については,ilame の各記事を参照されたい.

 ・ Booij, Geert. "Inherent versus Contextual Inflection and the Split Morphology Hypothesis." Yearbook of Morphology 1995. Ed. Geert Booij and Jaap van Marle. Dordrecht: Kluwer, 1996. 1--16.

[ | 固定リンク | 印刷用ページ ]

2016-04-23 Sat

#2553. 構造的メタファーと方向的メタファーの違い (2) [conceptual_metaphor][metaphor][metonymy][synaesthesia][cognitive_linguistics][terminology]

 昨日の記事 ([2016-04-22-1]) の続き.構造的メタファーはあるドメインの構造を類似的に別のドメインに移すものと理解してよいが,方向的メタファーは単純に類似性 (similarity) に基づいたドメインからドメインへの移転として捉えてよいだろうか.例えば,

 ・ MORE IS UP
 ・ HEALTH IS UP
 ・ CONTROL or POWER IS UP


という一連の方向的メタファーは,互いに「上(下)」に関する類似性に基づいて成り立っているというよりは,「多いこと」「健康であること」「支配・権力をもっていること」が物理的・身体的な「上」と共起することにより成り立っていると考えることもできないだろうか.共起性とは隣接性 (contiguity) とも言い換えられるから,結局のところ方向的メタファーは「メタファー」 (metaphor) といいながらも,実は「メトニミー」 (metonymy) なのではないかという疑問がわく.この2つの修辞法は,「#2496. metaphor と metonymy」 ([2016-02-26-1]) や 「#2406. metonymy」 ([2015-11-28-1]) で解説した通り,しばしば対置されてきたが,「#2196. マグリットの絵画における metaphor と metonymy の同居」 ([2015-05-02-1]) でも見たように,対立ではなく融和することがある.この観点から概念「メタファー」 (conceptual_metaphor) を,谷口 (79) を参照して改めて定義づけると,以下のようになる.

 ・ 概念メタファーは,2つの異なる概念 A, B の間を,「類似性」または「共起性」によって "A is B" と結びつけ,
 ・ 具体的な概念で抽象的な概念を特徴づけ理解するはたらきをもつ


 概念メタファーとは,共起性や隣接性に基づくメトニミーをも含み込んでいるものとも解釈できるのだ.概念「メタファー」の議論として始まったにもかかわらず「メトニミー」が関与してくるあたり,両者の関係は一般に言われるほど相対するものではなく,相補うものととらえたほうがよいのかもしれない.
 なお,このように2つの概念を類似性や共起性によって結びつけることをメタファー写像 (metaphorical mapping) と呼ぶ.共感覚表現 (synaesthesia) などは,共起性を利用したメタファー写像の適用である.

 ・ 谷口 一美 『学びのエクササイズ 認知言語学』 ひつじ書房,2006年.

[ | 固定リンク | 印刷用ページ ]

2016-04-22 Fri

#2552. 構造的メタファーと方向的メタファーの違い (1) [conceptual_metaphor][metaphor][cognitive_linguistics][terminology]

 昨日の記事「#2551. 概念メタファーの例をいくつか追加」 ([2016-04-21-1]) で,構造的メタファー (structural metaphor) と方向的メタファー (orientational metaphor) に触れた.両者の違いは,体系性の次元にある.前者は,ある概念をとりまく体系から別のものへの一方向の写像にすぎないが,後者はそのような内的な体系性をもった写像が,複数,互いに結び付き合っているという多次元なものだ.
 例えば,"TIME IS MONEY" の概念メタファーは,英語文化において,時間を金銭になぞらえる認知の様式が根付いており,その認知を反映した言語表現も多く観察されることを物語っている.時間に関する種々の属性や秩序は,金銭にもおよそそのまま当てはまることが多い.その方向性は,基本的に「時間→金」の一方向であり,その反対ではないという感覚がある.この関係を,一方向の内的体系性 (internal systematicity) と呼んでおこう.
 一方,"HAPPY IS UP; SAD IS DOWN" の概念メタファーは,"TIME IS MONEY" とは異質のように思われる.まず,それは対応する2つの命題,つまり "HAPPY IS UP" と "SAD IS DOWN" から成っているという点で異なる.一方向というよりは,双方向で互いに補完し合う関係だ.双方向の内的体系性と呼んでおきたい.さらに,このようなペアを相似的,並行的に複数挙げることができるという点がおもしろい.例えば,昨日の記事で挙げたように,"HAPPY IS UP; SAD IS DOWN", "CONSCIOUS IS UP; UNCONSCIOUS IS DOWN", "HEALTH AND LIFE ARE UP; SICKNESS AND DEATH ARE DOWN", "HAVING CONTROL or FORCE IS UP; BEING SUBJECT TO CONTROL or FORCE IS DOWN", "MORE IS UP; LESS IS DOWN", "FORESEEABLE FUTURE EVENTS ARE UP (and AHEAD)", "HIGH STATUS IS UP; LOW STATUS IS DOWN", "GOOD IS UP; BAD IS DOWN", "VIRTUE IS UP; DEPRAVITY IS DOWN", "RATIONAL IS UP; EMOTIONAL IS DOWN" などがそれに当たる.これらのペアは相互に関係していると思われ,全体として関係の小宇宙を形成している.換言すれば,「双方向の内的体系性」という塊が複数あり,互いに線で結ばれているというイメージだ.方向的メタファーが,構造的メタファーと次元が違うというのはこのことである.後者は前者よりも圧倒的に高次で複雑だが,体系的である.
 Lakoff and Johnson (14) の表現で両者の違いを表現すれば,structural metaphors とは "one concept is metaphorically structured in terms of another" であり,oritentational metaphors は "organizes a whole system of concepts with respect to one another" である.

 ・ Lakoff, George, and Mark Johnson. Metaphors We Live By. Chicago and London: U of Chicago P, 1980.

Referrer (Inside): [2016-04-23-1]

[ | 固定リンク | 印刷用ページ ]

2016-04-18 Mon

#2548. 概念メタファー [metaphor][conceptual_metaphor][cognitive_linguistics][terminology]

 今や古典となった Lakoff and Johnson の著書により,概念メタファー (conceptual_metaphor) という用語が(認知)言語学では広く知られるようになった.すでに「#2471. なぜ言語系統図は逆茂木型なのか」 ([2016-02-01-1]) でこの用語を用いたが,認知言語学上の基本事項として,改めて本記事で概念メタファーを紹介しよう.
 Lakoff and Johnson の提起した概念メタファーの考え方は,一言でいえば,メタファーとは単にことばの問題にとどまらず,それ以前に認識の問題,とらえ方のレベルの問題であるということだ.通常,メタファーとは "You are my sunshine." のように,"A is B." のような構文で明示的に表わされると信じられているが,実はそのような形式をとらない数々の表現のうちに,暗黙の前提として含まれていることが多いという(辻, p. 33).
 Lakoff and Johnson が挙げた典型例に,"ARGUMENT IS WAR" がある.英語には,議論を戦争と見立てる発想が根付いており,この見立てが数々の表現に滲出している.Lakoff and Johnson (4) より,例文を挙げよう.

 ・ Your claims are indefensible.
 ・ He attacked every weak point in my argument.
 ・ His criticisms were right on target.
 ・ I demolished his argument.
 ・ I've never won an argument with him.
 ・ You disagree? Okay, shoot!
 ・ If you use that strategy, he'll wipe you out.
 ・ He shot down all of my arguments.


 ここでは,直接的には戦争に関する用語や縁語とみなしうる語句が使われていながら,実際にはそれが議論に関わることばとして応用されている.これら個々の表現は,"ARGUMENT IS WAR" という概念メタファーが言語化されたものと解釈できるだろう.議論とは戦争であるという見立てが,単発の表現においてではなく,一連の表現において等しくみられる.
 メタファーは,従来,文学的な言語表現として非日常的な技巧とらえられる傾向があったが,実際にはこのように日常の言語使用や,さらに言語化される以前の認識レベルにおいて,非常にありふれたものであるということを,Lakoff and Johnson は指摘したのである.

 ・ Lakoff, George, and Mark Johnson. Metaphors We Live By. Chicago and London: U of Chicago P, 1980.
 ・ 辻 幸夫(編) 『新編 認知言語学キーワード事典』 研究社.2013年.

Referrer (Inside): [2016-12-11-1] [2016-04-21-1]

[ | 固定リンク | 印刷用ページ ]

2016-04-03 Sun

#2533. 言語変化の "spaghetti junction" (2) [terminology][pidgin][creole][language_change][terminology][tok_pisin][cognitive_linguistics][communication][teleology][causation][origin_of_language][evolution][prediction_of_language_change][invisible_hand]

 一昨日の記事 ([2016-04-01-1]) に引き続き,"spaghetti junction" について.今回は,この現象に関する Aitchison の1989年の論文を読んだので,要点をレポートする.
 Aitchison は,パプアニューギニアで広く話される Tok Pisin の時制・相・法の体系が,当初は様々な手段の混成からなっていたが,時とともに一貫したものになってきた様子を観察し,これを "spaghetti junction" の効果によるものと論じた.Tok Pisin に見られるこのような体系の変化は,関連しない他のピジン語やクレオール語でも観察されており,この類似性を説明するのに2つの対立する考え方が提起されているという.1つは Bickerton などの理論言語学者が主張するように,文法に共時的な制約が働いており,言語変化は必然的にある種の体系に終結する,というものだ.この立場は,言語的制約がヒトの遺伝子に組み込まれていると想定するため,"bioprogram" 説と呼ばれる.もう1つの考え方は,言語,認知,コミュニケーションに関する様々な異なる過程が相互に作用した結果,最終的に似たような解決策が選ばれるというものだ.この立場が "spaghetti junction" である.Aitchison (152) は,この2つ目の見方を以下のように説明し,支持している.

This second approach regards a language at any particular point in time as if it were a spaghetti junction which allows a number of possible exit routes. Given certain recurring communicative requirements, and some fairly general assumptions about language, one can sometimes see why particular options are preferred, and others passed over. In this way, one can not only map out a number of preferred pathways for language, but might also find out that some apparent 'constraints' are simply low probability outcomes. 'No way out' signs on a spaghetti junction may be rare, but only a small proportion of possible exit routes might be selected.


 Aitchison (169) は,この2つの立場の違いを様々な言い方で表現している."innate programming" に対する "probable rediscovery" であるとか,言語の変化の "prophylaxis" (予防)に対する "therapy" (治療)である等々(「予防」と「治療」については,「#1979. 言語変化の目的論について再考」 ([2014-09-27-1]) を参照).ただし,Aitchison は,両立場は相反するものというよりは,相補的かもしれないと考えているようだ.
 "spaghetti junction" 説に立つのであれば,今後の言語変化研究の課題は,「選ばれやすい道筋」をいかに予測し,説明するかということになるだろう.Aitchison (170) は,論文を次のように締めくくっている.

A number of principles combined to account for the pathways taken, principles based jointly on general linguistic capabilities, cognitive abilities, and communicative needs. The route taken is therefore the result of the rediscovery of viable options, rather than the effect of an inevitable bioprogram. At the spaghetti junctions of language, few exits are truly closed. However, a number of converging factors lead speakers to take certain recurrent routes. An overall aim in future research, then, must be to predict and explain the preferred pathways of language evolution.


 このような研究の成果は言語の発生と初期の発達にも新たな光を当ててくれるかもしれない.当初は様々な選択肢があったが,後に諸要因により「選ばれやすい道筋」が採用され,現代につながる言語の型ができたのではないかと.

 ・ Aitchison, Jean. "Spaghetti Junctions and Recurrent Routes: Some Preferred Pathways in Language Evolution." Lingua 77 (1989): 151--71.

[ | 固定リンク | 印刷用ページ ]

2016-04-03 Sun

#2533. 言語変化の "spaghetti junction" (2) [terminology][pidgin][creole][language_change][terminology][tok_pisin][cognitive_linguistics][communication][teleology][causation][origin_of_language][evolution][prediction_of_language_change][invisible_hand]

 一昨日の記事 ([2016-04-01-1]) に引き続き,"spaghetti junction" について.今回は,この現象に関する Aitchison の1989年の論文を読んだので,要点をレポートする.
 Aitchison は,パプアニューギニアで広く話される Tok Pisin の時制・相・法の体系が,当初は様々な手段の混成からなっていたが,時とともに一貫したものになってきた様子を観察し,これを "spaghetti junction" の効果によるものと論じた.Tok Pisin に見られるこのような体系の変化は,関連しない他のピジン語やクレオール語でも観察されており,この類似性を説明するのに2つの対立する考え方が提起されているという.1つは Bickerton などの理論言語学者が主張するように,文法に共時的な制約が働いており,言語変化は必然的にある種の体系に終結する,というものだ.この立場は,言語的制約がヒトの遺伝子に組み込まれていると想定するため,"bioprogram" 説と呼ばれる.もう1つの考え方は,言語,認知,コミュニケーションに関する様々な異なる過程が相互に作用した結果,最終的に似たような解決策が選ばれるというものだ.この立場が "spaghetti junction" である.Aitchison (152) は,この2つ目の見方を以下のように説明し,支持している.

This second approach regards a language at any particular point in time as if it were a spaghetti junction which allows a number of possible exit routes. Given certain recurring communicative requirements, and some fairly general assumptions about language, one can sometimes see why particular options are preferred, and others passed over. In this way, one can not only map out a number of preferred pathways for language, but might also find out that some apparent 'constraints' are simply low probability outcomes. 'No way out' signs on a spaghetti junction may be rare, but only a small proportion of possible exit routes might be selected.


 Aitchison (169) は,この2つの立場の違いを様々な言い方で表現している."innate programming" に対する "probable rediscovery" であるとか,言語の変化の "prophylaxis" (予防)に対する "therapy" (治療)である等々(「予防」と「治療」については,「#1979. 言語変化の目的論について再考」 ([2014-09-27-1]) を参照).ただし,Aitchison は,両立場は相反するものというよりは,相補的かもしれないと考えているようだ.
 "spaghetti junction" 説に立つのであれば,今後の言語変化研究の課題は,「選ばれやすい道筋」をいかに予測し,説明するかということになるだろう.Aitchison (170) は,論文を次のように締めくくっている.

A number of principles combined to account for the pathways taken, principles based jointly on general linguistic capabilities, cognitive abilities, and communicative needs. The route taken is therefore the result of the rediscovery of viable options, rather than the effect of an inevitable bioprogram. At the spaghetti junctions of language, few exits are truly closed. However, a number of converging factors lead speakers to take certain recurrent routes. An overall aim in future research, then, must be to predict and explain the preferred pathways of language evolution.


 このような研究の成果は言語の発生と初期の発達にも新たな光を当ててくれるかもしれない.当初は様々な選択肢があったが,後に諸要因により「選ばれやすい道筋」が採用され,現代につながる言語の型ができたのではないかと.

 ・ Aitchison, Jean. "Spaghetti Junctions and Recurrent Routes: Some Preferred Pathways in Language Evolution." Lingua 77 (1989): 151--71.

[ | 固定リンク | 印刷用ページ ]

2016-04-01 Fri

#2531. 言語変化の "spaghetti junction" [terminology][pidgin][creole][language_change][terminology][invisible_hand]

 地理的にかけ離れた2つのクレオール語が,非常に似た発展をたどり,非常に似た特徴を備えるに至ることが,しばしばある.Aitchison (233--34) によると,これを説明するのに "bioprogram" 説と "spaghetti junction" 説とがあるという.前者は Bickerton の唱える説であり,人間の精神には生物学的にプログラムされた青写真があり,クレオール語にみられる普遍的な特徴はそこから必然的に生み出されるとする (see 「#445. ピジン語とクレオール語の起源に関する諸説」 ([2010-07-16-1])) .一方,後者は,多くの道路が交差する spaghetti junction のように,ピジン語からクレオール語が発達する当初には,様々な可能性が生み出されるものの,可能な選択肢が徐々にせばまり,最終的には1つの出口へ収斂するというシナリオだ.
 理論的には両説ともに想定することができるが,調査してみると,すべてのクレオール語が全く同じ経路をたどるわけでもなく,似た特徴が突然に発現するわけでもなさそうなので,spaghetti junction 説が妥当であると,Aitchison (234) は論じている.
 spaghetti junction 説が言語変化の観点から興味深いのは,クレオール語の発達に関してばかりではなく,通常の言語変化に関しても同じように,この説を想定することができることだ.通常の言語変化にも様々な経路のオプションがあると思われるが,確率論的には,そこにある程度の傾向なり予測可能な部分なりが観察されるのも事実である.その意味では,それほど混み合っていない spaghetti junction の例と考えられるかもしれない.クレオール語の発達がそれと異なるのは,発達の速度があまりに速く,あたかも狭い場所に複雑多岐な spaghetti junction が集中しているようにみえる点だ.
 通常の言語変化とクレオール語の発達の違いが,もしこのように速度に存するにすぎないのであれば,後者を観察することは,前者の早回し版を観察することにほかならないということになる.クレオール語研究と言語変化論は,互いにこのような関係にあるのかもしれず,そのために両者の連動に注意しておく必要がある.Aitchison (234) 曰く,

. . . the stages by which pidgins develop into creoles seem to be normal processes of change. More of them happen simultaneously, and they happen faster, than in a full language. This makes pidgins and creoles valuable 'laboratories' for the observation of change.


 ・ Aitchison, Jean. Language Change: Progress or Decay. 3rd ed. Cambridge: CUP, 2001.

[ | 固定リンク | 印刷用ページ ]

2016-04-01 Fri

#2531. 言語変化の "spaghetti junction" [terminology][pidgin][creole][language_change][terminology][invisible_hand]

 地理的にかけ離れた2つのクレオール語が,非常に似た発展をたどり,非常に似た特徴を備えるに至ることが,しばしばある.Aitchison (233--34) によると,これを説明するのに "bioprogram" 説と "spaghetti junction" 説とがあるという.前者は Bickerton の唱える説であり,人間の精神には生物学的にプログラムされた青写真があり,クレオール語にみられる普遍的な特徴はそこから必然的に生み出されるとする (see 「#445. ピジン語とクレオール語の起源に関する諸説」 ([2010-07-16-1])) .一方,後者は,多くの道路が交差する spaghetti junction のように,ピジン語からクレオール語が発達する当初には,様々な可能性が生み出されるものの,可能な選択肢が徐々にせばまり,最終的には1つの出口へ収斂するというシナリオだ.
 理論的には両説ともに想定することができるが,調査してみると,すべてのクレオール語が全く同じ経路をたどるわけでもなく,似た特徴が突然に発現するわけでもなさそうなので,spaghetti junction 説が妥当であると,Aitchison (234) は論じている.
 spaghetti junction 説が言語変化の観点から興味深いのは,クレオール語の発達に関してばかりではなく,通常の言語変化に関しても同じように,この説を想定することができることだ.通常の言語変化にも様々な経路のオプションがあると思われるが,確率論的には,そこにある程度の傾向なり予測可能な部分なりが観察されるのも事実である.その意味では,それほど混み合っていない spaghetti junction の例と考えられるかもしれない.クレオール語の発達がそれと異なるのは,発達の速度があまりに速く,あたかも狭い場所に複雑多岐な spaghetti junction が集中しているようにみえる点だ.
 通常の言語変化とクレオール語の発達の違いが,もしこのように速度に存するにすぎないのであれば,後者を観察することは,前者の早回し版を観察することにほかならないということになる.クレオール語研究と言語変化論は,互いにこのような関係にあるのかもしれず,そのために両者の連動に注意しておく必要がある.Aitchison (234) 曰く,

. . . the stages by which pidgins develop into creoles seem to be normal processes of change. More of them happen simultaneously, and they happen faster, than in a full language. This makes pidgins and creoles valuable 'laboratories' for the observation of change.


 ・ Aitchison, Jean. Language Change: Progress or Decay. 3rd ed. Cambridge: CUP, 2001.

[ | 固定リンク | 印刷用ページ ]

2016-03-31 Thu

#2530. evolution の evolution (4) [evolution][history_of_linguistics][language_change][language_myth][neogrammarian][saussure][chomsky][diachrony][generative_grammar][terminology]

 過去3日間の記事 ([2016-03-28-1], [2016-03-29-1], [2016-03-30-1]) で,言語変化を扱う分野において "evolution" という用語がいかにとらえられてきたかを考えた.とりわけ,近年の言語学における "evolution" は,一度その用語に手垢がつき,半ば地下に潜ったあとに再び浮上してきた概念であることを確認した.この沈潜は1世紀以上続いていたといってよく,ここから1つの疑問が生じる.言語学者がダーウィンの革命的な思想の影響を受けたのは19世紀後半だが,なぜそのときに言語学は生物学の大変革に見合う規模の変革を経なかったのだろうか.なぜその100年以上も後の20世紀後半になってようやく "linguistic evolution" が提起され,評価されるようになったのだろうか.この間に言語学(者)には何が起こっていたのだろうか.
 この問題について,Nerlich の論文をみつけて読んでみた.Nerlich はこの空白の時間の理由を,(1) 19世紀後半に Schleicher が進化論を誤解したこと,(2) 20世紀前半に Saussure の分析的,経験主義的な方針に立った共時的言語学が言語学の主流となったこと,(3) 20世紀半ばにかけて Bloomfield や Chomsky を始めとするアメリカ言語学が意味,多様性,話者を軽視してきたこと,の3点に帰している.
 (1) について Nerlich (104) は, Schleicher はダーウィンの進化論を,持論である「言語の進歩と堕落」の理論的サポートとして利用としたために,本来の進化論の主要概念である "variation, selection and adaptation" を言語に適用せずに終えてしまったことが問題だったとしている.ダーウィン主義を標榜しながら,その実,ダーウィン以前の考え方から離れられていなかったのである.例えば,ダーウィンにとって生物の種の分類はあくまで2次的なものであり,主たる関心は変形の過程だったが,Schleicher は言語の分類にこだわっていたのだ.ダーウィン以前の個体発生の考え方とダーウィンの種の進化論とが混同されていたといってよいだろう.Schleicher は,ダーウィンを真に理解していなかったといえる.
 (2) の段階は Saussure に代表される共時的言語学者が活躍するが,その時代に至るまでにも,Schleicher の言語有機体説は青年文法学派 (neogrammarian) 等により,おおいに批判されていた.しかし,その批判は,言語変化の研究への関心のために建設的に利用されることはなく,皮肉なことに,言語変化を扱う通時態という観点自体を脇に置いておき,共時態に関心を集中させる結果となった.また,langue への関心がもてはやされるようになると,parole に属する言語使用や話者の話題は取り上げられることがなくなった.言語は一様であるとの過程のもとで,言語変化とその前提となる多様性や変異の問題も等閑視された.
 このような共時態重視の勢いは,(3) に至って絶頂を迎えた.分布主義の言語学や生成文法は意味という不安定な部門の研究を脇に置き,言語の一様性を前提とすることで成果を上げていった.
 この (3) の時代を抜け出して,ようやく言語学者たちは使用,話者,意味,多様性,変異,そして変化という世界が,従来の枠の外側に広がっていることに気づいた.この「気づき」について,Nerlich (106--07) は次の一節でやや熱く紹介している.

Thus meaning, language change and language use became problems and were mainly discarded from the science of language for reasons of theoretical tidiness: meaning and change are rather messy phenomena. Hence autonomy, synchrony and homogeneity finally enclosed language in a kind of magic triangle that defended it against any sort of indeterminacy, fluctuation or change. But outside the static triangle, that ideal domain of structural and generative linguistics, lies the terra incognita of linguistic dynamics, where one can discover the main sources of linguistic change, contextuality, history and heterogeneity, fields of study that are slowly being rediscovered by post-Chomskyan and post-Saussurean linguists. This terra incognita is populated by a curious species, also recently discovered: the language user! S/he acts linguistically and non-linguistically in a heterogenous and ever-changing world, constantly trying to adapt the available linguistic means to her/his ever changing ends and communicative needs. In acting and interacting the speakers are the real vectors of linguistic evolution, and their choices must be studied if we are to understand the nature of language. It is not enough to stop at a static analysis of language as a product, organism or system. The study of evolutionary processes and procedures should help to overcome the sterility of the old dichotomies, such as those between langue/parole, competence/performance and even synchrony/diachrony.


 このようにして20世紀後半から通時態への関心が戻り,変化といえばダーウィンの進化論だ,というわけで,進化論の言語への応用が再開したのである.いや,最初の Schleicher の試みが失敗だったとすれば,今初めて応用が始まったところといえるかもしれない.

 ・ Nerlich, Brigitte. "The Evolution of the Concept of 'Linguistic Evolution' in the 19th and 20th Century." Lingua 77 (1989): 101--12.

[ | 固定リンク | 印刷用ページ ]

2016-03-30 Wed

#2529. evolution の evolution (3) [evolution][history_of_linguistics][language_change][teleology][invisible_hand][causation][language_myth][drift][exaptation][terminology]

 2日間にわたる標題の記事 ([2016-03-28-1], [2016-03-29-1]) についての第3弾.今回は,evolution の第3の語義,現在の生物学で受け入れられている語義が,いかに言語変化論に応用されうるかについて考える.McMahon (334) より,改めて第3の語義を確認しておこう.

the development of a race, species or other group ...: the process by which through a series of changes or steps any living organism or group of organisms has acquired the morphological and physiological characters which distinguish it: the theory that the various types of animals and plants have their origin in other preexisting types, the distinguishable differences being due to modifications in successive generations.


 現在盛んになってきている言語における evolution の議論の最先端は,まさにこの語義での evolution を前提としている.これまでの2回の記事で見てきたように,19世紀から20世紀の後半にかけて,言語学における evolution という用語には手垢がついてしまった.言語学において,この用語はダーウィン以来の科学的な装いを示しながらも,特殊な価値観を帯びていることから否定的なレッテルを貼られてきた.しかし,それは生物(学)と言語(学)を安易に比較してきたがゆえであり,丁寧に両者の平行性と非平行性を整理すれば,有用な比喩であり続ける可能性は残る.その比較の際に拠って立つべき evolution とは,上記の語義の evolution である.定義には含まれていないが,生物進化の分野で広く受け入れられている mutation, variation, natural selection, adaptation などの用語・概念を,いかに言語変化に応用できるかが鍵である.
 McMahon (334--40) は,生物(学)と言語(学)の(非)平行性についての考察を要領よくまとめている.互いの異同をよく理解した上であれば,(歴史)言語学が(歴史)生物学から学ぶべきことは非常に多く,むしろ今後期待のもてる領域であると主張している.McMahon (340) の締めくくりは次の通りだ.

[T]he Darwinian theory of biological evolution, with its interplay of mutation, variation and natural selection, has clear parallels in historical linguistics, and may be used to provide enlightening accounts of linguistic change. Having borrowed the core elements of evolutionary theory, we may then also explore novel concepts from biology, such as exaptation, and assess their relevance for linguistic change. Indeed, the establishment of parallels with historical biology may provide one of the most profitable future directions for historical linguistics.


 生物(学)と言語(学)の(非)平行性の問題については「#807. 言語系統図と生物系統図の類似点と相違点」 ([2011-07-13-1]) も参照されたい.

Referrer (Inside): [2016-03-31-1]

[ | 固定リンク | 印刷用ページ ]

2016-03-29 Tue

#2528. evolution の evolution (2) [evolution][history_of_linguistics][language_change][teleology][invisible_hand][causation][language_myth][drift][terminology]

 昨日の記事 ([2016-03-28-1]) に引き続き,言語変化論における evolution の解釈について.今回は evolution の目的論 (teleology) 的な含意をもつ第2の語義,"A series of related changes in a certain direction" に注目したい.昨日扱った語義 (1) と今回の語義 (2) は言語変化の方向性を前提とする点において共通しているが,(1) が人類史レベルの壮大にして長期的な価値観を伴った方向性に関係するのに対して,(2) は価値観は廃するものの,言語変化には中期的には運命づけられた方向づけがあると主張する.
 端的にいえば,目的論とは "effects precede (in time) their final causes" という発想である (qtd. in McMahon 325 from p. 312 of Lass, Roger. "Linguistic Orthogenesis? Scots Vowel Length and the English Length Conspiracy." Historical Linguistics. Volume 1: Syntax, Morphology, Internal and Comparative Reconstruction. Ed. John M. Anderson and Charles Jones. Amsterdam: North Holland, 1974. 311--43.) .通常,時間的に先立つ X が生じたから続いて Y が生じた,という因果関係で物事の説明をするが,目的論においては,後に Y が生じることができるよう先に X が生じる,と論じる.この2種類の説明は向きこそ正反対だが,いずれも1つの言語変化に対する説明として使えてしまうという点が重要である.例えば,ある言語のある段階で [mb], [md], [mg], [nb], [nd], [ng], [ŋb], [ŋd], [ŋg] の子音連続が許容されていたものが,後の段階では [mb], [nd], [ŋg] の3種しか許容されなくなったとする.通常の音声学的説明によれば「同器官性同化 (homorganic assimilation) が生じた」となるが,目的論的な説明を採用すると,「調音しやすくするために同器官性の子音連続となった」となる.
 言語学史においては,様々な論者が目的論をとってきたし,それに反駁する論者も同じくらい現われてきた.例えば Jakobson は目的論者だったし,生成音韻論の言語観も目的論の色が濃い.一方,Bloomfield や Lass は,目的論の立場に公然と反対している.McMahon (330--31) も,目的論を「目的の目的論」 (teleology of purpose) と「機能の目的論」 (teleology of function) に分け,いずれにも問題点があることを論じ,目的論的な説明が施されてきた各々のケースについて非目的論的な説明も同時に可能であると反論した.McMahon の結論を引用して,この第2の意味の evolution の妥当性を再考する材料としたい.

There is a useful verdict of Not Proven in the Scottish courts, and this seems the best judgement on teleology. We cannot prove teleological explanations wrong (although this in itself may be an indictment, in a discipline where many regard potentially falsifiable hypotheses as the only valid ones), but nor can we prove them right; they rest on faith in predestination and the omniscient guiding hand. More pragmatically, alleged cases of teleology tend to have equally plausible alternative explanations, and there are valid arguments against the teleological position. Even the weaker teleology of function is flawed because of the numerous cases where it simply does not seem to be applicable. However, this rejection does not make the concept of conspiracy, synchronic or diachronic, any less intriguing, or the perception of directionality . . . any less real.


 ・ McMahon, April M. S. Understanding Language Change. Cambridge: CUP, 1994.

Referrer (Inside): [2016-03-31-1] [2016-03-30-1]

[ | 固定リンク | 印刷用ページ ]

Powered by WinChalow1.0rc4 based on chalow